...Think about it. Barring dementia – and as much as we hear about dementia, not everyone over 65 has become unable to make decisions – our elders should be able to exercise their rights as adults. Aging should increase dignity, not take it away. Maturing should earn us respect for what we’ve been through, not derision for being a bit weathered physically and somewhat different in how we may process information.  If you carefully read the first paragraph of this article you’ll see that much of what I describe sounds like raising children. Ouch! Read more →


I’m 78-years-old and I have lived with my son and his wife for two years. I’m feeling hemmed in and I think that they may feel the same way. They are kind, but my daughter-in-law seems stressed when we’re together too much even though in the past we have always gotten along well. The house doesn't allow much privacy which may be why we get on each other's nerves. I also miss being around people my own age. This arrangement seemed like a good idea, but I’m afraid we all think it’s a mistake. I’d gladly move to assisted living but I’ve been paying rent to the kids, which helps with their bills. For this reason, I’m reluctant to tell them that I’d like to move while we’re all still getting along rather than wait until our relationship turns so sour that it's impossible to fix. How do I approach them considering the financial arrangement? – TE Read more →


Middle-aged and worried about your memory slips? You probably don’t have dementia. The majority of the memory slips that concern this age group, and even those significantly older, are due to stress and other factors rather than impending dementia. However, researchers have now found that people who are suffering from memory loss but are unaware of their problem are most likely developing the disease. Read more →