10 Tips to Ease Alzheimer’s Sundowning

NighttreesMany people who have Alzheimer’s disease experience times, generally as daylight fades and evening approaches, when their symptoms intensify. This phenomenon is called sundowning. It’s thought that sundowning stems from a combination of factors such as disorientation due to lack of light, natural fatigue and abnormal disruptions in the body clock. While there’s no cure for sundowning some medications can help. Lifestyle changes can be a vital part of managing sundowning behavior, as well. Below are some tips that may help you and your loved one cope with this often frustrating end-of-day behavior: 

Read more on HealthCentral about sundowning and some tips that may help you control your loved one's behavior:

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Tips to Help Someone with Dementia Bathe Without a Battle

BathingBathing issues can be one of the most frustrating parts of dementia care, but the stress can be lowered by flexibility and insight on the part of the caregiver. While your loved one with dementia may need a good deal of washing up of face, hands and private areas, a  daily bath or shower is rarely necessary. Once or twice a week in a shower or bath should be enough for a complete body wash. If necessary, large bathing cloths can be used on the full body. The idea is not to become ridged in your thinking when it comes to how often a full bath is needed.

View slide show on HealthCentral about bathing tips:

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Primary Caregiver Often Takes Brunt of Abuse

DepressedDear Carol: My mother was both physically and verbally abusive to me when I was growing up but the last 15 years, since I’ve been out of the house, we got along pretty good. Then, last year, she was diagnosed with early to mid-stage Alzheimer’s. That’s when we decided that I should move in with her so that I could provide care. I had to quit work to do this, but Mom and my two siblings were all on board for Mom paying me a small monthly stipend to care for her.

Read more on Inforum about caregiver abuse:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling