...Realty check: Wrong. Most caregivers will, at least occasionally, have these feelings. You are not alone and you are not a bad person. You are a human being who’d like some control over your own life. You didn’t ask to be put in a situation where you have little chance to work on fulfilling even the simplest of your own dreams. Yet, the situation presented itself and you stepped up to the plate. Read more →


Historically, aging has been a difficult topic for women and when it is talked about all, most likely it is in a negative light. Seldom do we read about all that women gain as we pile on the decades. Anne Simpson, 81, is changing that by discussing the complete picture. In “Do You Feel as Old as You Are? Conversations With My Granddaughter,” Simpson answers 40 questions asked to her by her 21-year-old granddaughter, Alison Leslie. The book explores ideas about aging and how women have related to one another across generations. Read more →


A special day for your mom is coming up and she’s deep in the land of dementia. You struggle internally about whether you should even go through the motions of celebrating since she won’t understand what you are doing. Will making a big deal of the day just confuse her more? Is it even worth going through this routine when knowing that she doesn’t understand what you’re celebrating nearly breaks your heart? Read more →


DICE is an acronym for Describe, Investigate, Evaluate, and Create: The DICE program recommends that caregivers - both professional and family - treat each person with dementia as an individual and also be aware that as symptoms change, approaches by caregivers should also change. DICE is a partnership between the physician, the patient, and the caregiver. Read more →


...Don’t let a bias against alternative medicine put you off. While we now have the blessing of the NIH to use rosemary, lemon, lavender, and orange by the inhaled method to help calm Alzheimer’s symptoms, we can also seek advice from trained professionals who may help us make the most of any number of ancient practices for ourselves and our loved ones. Read more →


Dear Carol: My dad is 86 and quite healthy other than his eyes. Recently, he developed the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and needs to get regular injections in his eyes to slow the leaking of the blood vessels. Dad tolerates the treatment well, so I’ve been taking him to the clinic for this but my sister is having a fit. Read more →


Ideally, family members see one another often enough that they can become comfortable discussing issues that come up naturally as parents grow older. When this is the case, adult children are likely to hear when close friends of their parents have moved to assisted living, or have become ill. They may even hear stories where their parents’ friends didn’t assign powers of attorney for healthcare and their finances so that when one or both became very ill, their children are left trying to care for their parents with their hands legally tied. Read more →


People living with dementia are anxious to teach the public that while a dementia diagnosis is not what anyone wants to receive, it’s not as if they are "healthy" the day before the diagnosis and in late-stage dementia the day after. Many people live for years with manageable dementia, and any number of them would call their lives satisfying. Read more →


Immediately, you recognize that your nasty response is way out of proportion to your friend's comment. She's been there for you, even though when caregiving starts, friends often scatter.The person you are really angry at is your sister who repeatedly criticizes your caregiving ability. The problem is that words, once uttered, can't be withdrawn. Read more →


Most of us find, as we travel our unique journeys, that certain phrases or concepts take on the status of truth in our worldview. Our personal truths may not be identical to those of others, but we know what is true for us. Below, I've shared, as food for thought, a few of my own truths that have developed during my personal caregiving journey. Read more →